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MJP121212

Science?

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Has anyone found a great integrated science that's not overly expensive? Bonus points if I can tie it in with any of the Heirloom things we have! 

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Well, we *wing it*!

We have lots of Science related books that we read through or pull experiments out of. On occasions I will throw together a mini unit study. (when I'm feeling ambitious) 

Sometimes if my kids have questions about something, we research it and learn.

 

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I suppose I could say what we do for science but it isn't related at all to the Heirloom audios.....I tried science curriculum and it never went well so now they just read books about science, cook with me, do an occasional experiment and observe nature. They know the scientific method and have many science laws, theories, and facts memorized due to CC so I figure they can apply that to whatever they read. We have the same approach to history, basically we give them a general foundation and follow their interests in a really relaxed way. 

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Science is my least favorite subject to teach and to learn truthfully.  My oldest is doing biology this year indepedently, and then I'm teach botany in a co-op setting for middle-high school kids.      But to incorporate the Heirloom products, I'd think you'd have to do unit studies to see what scientific discoveries were going on in each time frame.

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I'd be interested in knowing the ages of everyone's children. I like a living book approach, but I've got high school students who need credits for transcripts so things are a little more tricky. Although, we do tend to apply our own guidelines to these courses.

For my younger kids we do nature studies, learn more hands-on, take plenty of field trips and hikes, and more. For the older few, we're more focused, but lighten up on the textbook as much as possible. I did just come across Chemistry by Dr. Englin and I love it!! I wish I'd found this years ago. It's fun, simple to follow, and full of easily accessible experiments. Freshman year we studied Biology, Sophomore Astronomy/Oceanography, and this year is Chemistry. Next year will more than likely be Anatomy and Physiology. 

In regard to the OP, perhaps instead of focusing on a particular area of study, you might choose to look at scientific advancement during the particular era? For example, if I am listening to Wulf the Saxon, we might research major scientists during that time. We might learn more about scientific advancements of the time period. As there are many battle scenes, what scientific methods did they apply as medicines/cures, how did they treat wounds, and the like. I'm sure you get the picture. 

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On 2/22/2018 at 8:55 PM, Cristina@ahomeschoolmom.com said:

In regard to the OP, perhaps instead of focusing on a particular area of study, you might choose to look at scientific advancement during the particular era? For example, if I am listening to Wulf the Saxon, we might research major scientists during that time. We might learn more about scientific advancements of the time period. As there are many battle scenes, what scientific methods did they apply as medicines/cures, how did they treat wounds, and the like. I'm sure you get the picture. 

Jay Wile has "Science in the..." books for elementary ages.  They cover science in a particular age and have great history tie-ins that feel natural and not forced.  There are experiments and writing assignments for the lessons.  They cover Science in the Beginning, Ancient World, Scientific Revolution, Age of Reason, and Industrial Age.  They're published by Berean Builders.

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On 2/22/2018 at 8:55 PM, Cristina@ahomeschoolmom.com said:

I'd be interested in knowing the ages of everyone's children. I like a living book approach, but I've got high school students who need credits for transcripts so things are a little more tricky. Although, we do tend to apply our own guidelines to these courses.

We always did nature study when the girls were young, then we used some ideas from the God's Design science books in the middle grades. For High School we did use some textbooks as our spine, but there was a LOT of adaptation. There are some Charlotte Mason/ living books types of science books out there you can choose from, you just have to spend more time researching them. We used several of the Wonders of Creation books from Master Books and the Exploring: ______ series by John Hudson Tiner also from Master Books. For Anatomy we used Dr. Menton's Body of Evidence video series w/ the study guide. For Biology our two favorite were Science Shepherd Biology (very thorough and long, but good) and Bridget Ardoin's Science for High School Biology (very Charlotte Mason and a bit abstract,but also good for the right kids.) Astronomy might have been our favorite, we used The Stargazers Guide to the nIght Sky and Taking Back Astronomy (both by Dr Jason Lisle.)

Arlene is 17 now, so I think we are done with specific science courses once she finishes her Ecology book... but we love being outdoors, so we will continue to do, see, and learn. :)

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