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Ways to Learn Away from home?

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We're splitting our fall between 2 locations and can't bring everything with us between the 2 spots. My oldest are both in high school which makes it more challenging. The youngest is 2nd grade.

What are some ways that you take homeschool on the road?

(We're doing some Audio adventures as part of it!)

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Historical places.....research the websites before you go as I have found discount days, or extras like phone apps that enhance the experience or recently Historic Jamestown is doing a junior ranger program where you can do activities throughout the historic site that encompasses learning history and then earn a ranger badge at the end by a park ranger....Just one way to bring learning to life!!!  We are headed to Niagra falls this weekend so will have to let you know what we learn there!

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I don't have high schoolers yet, but my first thought was to put as much on laptops or tablets that can travel with you - curriculum, e-books, digital study guides.  I also agree to work in some of their hours through the actual traveling and field trips if possible, though I guess it would depend on what courses they are taking and what relevant trips you can find.  When I was a homeschooled high schooler I found some way to make everything fit somewhere!  

We definitely do the Adventures and audio books when we travel.  It's great for history and literature, obviously.  Traveling lends itself well to geography and a lot of math if you're driving, maybe more so for your youngest.  Our upcoming trip is to visit family but also for "vacation" so we are planning to do a couple of larger attractions, but I have also looked up several free/inexpensive things to do as well.  I've found a city park that has a historic village and war museum, wetlands, nature centers, an animal refuge/sanctuary, a science center, an art gallery, concerts, the monetary museum at the federal reserve . . . so a lot of options to choose from already, and that was just with a few minutes of googling and jotting down ideas.  

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For high school it is possible to keep it pretty simple when away from home: think about historical novels or classics. Read and write a literary response essay.

Math might be more challenging, but if you can just take a few things with you, it would be great.

Maybe do science in one place and history in another that way you can leave those subjects in their places and not need to transport them.

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We travel full-time for our Christian music mission. This is our sixth year living in a travel trailer. We have eight children ranging from 2-20.

In a travel trailer you are limited as to weight, so I can't carry everything I would like to school that entire age range. Also, our internet connection is not always reliable, so we can't use (or generally afford) online classes. Our college girl (18-year-old college senior) is making it work, though. 

My first piece of advice is don't stress it! There is SO MUCH LEARNING to be done just from being out in the world. Curricula is no replacement for getting out there and seeing and doing. 

Someone already mentioned historical sites--that is HUGE! Also natural wonders, like national parks, offer an enormous array of educational opportunities. We are Creationists, so exploring nature and comparing the old and new world perspectives to what we see is a great learning experience for all of us. Meeting people and learning about the jobs they have and their experiences is seriously the best social studies course anybody could offer--what we see out in the real world and what the media shows are drastically different. Everyone should shut off their TVs and computers and walk around town and talk to somebody. 

I try to maintain some consistency on topics such as math. I want to see somewhat steady progress at all times--I can tell when someone slacks, and then I nudge them forward. For some thing I don't use a curriculum. For example, I often don't use a writing curriculum, but have them write letters and narrations when they're young, and essays and articles when they're older. I'm a writer, though, so I can edit and guide. This saves on weight and space also. For other topics, like history, sometimes they listen to audio (Heirloom, Librivox), sometimes we're full-on with a topic, sometimes we're just exploring. It all depends on what is available in our world at the time. If, for example, we're heading to Daniel Boone country, I will look up some info on that or get a book or plan an outing. 

We also review a lot of curricula for the Homeschool Review Crew. That gives us a short taste of something. If we absolutely love it, we make space for it and keep it in the trailer. If we don't, out if goes. I would say we keep 20%, so we're pretty particular about where our time goes. If you're not a reviewer, you can use this same approach by having one set of resources on a subject of interest at one location, and then switch to something else when you move to the other location.

Will my kids have gaps in their learning? Most definitely! So did I after all those years at private schools. My kids' gaps are cheaper, and they know how to fill them themselves, since they are being raised in an atmosphere of learning. 

If you have any questions for me specifically, we're always happy to answer. Also, not to make this about self-promotion, but if you check out my profile I've got some links you can follow to see how we're making it work in the real world, including a blog (The Travel Bags) and a YouTube channel.

Good luck to you on this adventure! 

Edited by cbagasao@gmail.com
spelling error--I'm so ashamed
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If you are traveling a lot, I agree that life skills are just as important as book learning. If they learn how to successfully use a map - whether a paper one, a gps system, or a state park trail map - they are integrating several skills. Learning how to shop by themselves (navigate the checkout lanes without help) is also a necessary skill. You would be surprised by the number of college ages kids who calm into the grocery store where I work who have trouble using the uscan computers or finding the toilet paper.

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23 hours ago, carolemmert14@gmail.com said:

If you are traveling a lot, I agree that life skills are just as important as book learning. If they learn how to successfully use a map - whether a paper one, a gps system, or a state park trail map - they are integrating several skills. Learning how to shop by themselves (navigate the checkout lanes without help) is also a necessary skill. You would be surprised by the number of college ages kids who calm into the grocery store where I work who have trouble using the uscan computers or finding the toilet paper.

I wish this surprised me, but I have worked as a bank teller.  Balancing a checkbook, using the ATM, endorsing their paychecks, writing checks, transferring money between accounts.  Teach them to do it on paper, because you can't rely on an ATM balance, and online banking CAN go down. 

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On 10/10/2017 at 9:11 PM, momsheartblog@gmail.com said:

I wish this surprised me, but I have worked as a bank teller.  Balancing a checkbook, using the ATM, endorsing their paychecks, writing checks, transferring money between accounts.  Teach them to do it on paper, because you can't rely on an ATM balance, and online banking CAN go down. 

This is another reason to teach the cursive - so they can actually sign checks, making it harder for someone else to steal their identity at the bank.

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A library card for those amazing books and some of the audio books that you can download. I have just learned of a place that rents homeschool curriculum-https://www.yellowhousebookrental.com/

I google homeschool book rental and was surprised how many sites are out there. This might help until you are settled in one place. I mean being on the Crew I know you have some amazing curriculum on your shelves.

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We just took a walk today and learned all about how cotton grows.....since there are TONS of fields at the end of our road, funny how cotton actually grows on a plant and blooms!

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Can you use an online site? We use SchoolhouseTeachers for chemistry and everything is online. We do print it off but that is for convenience and preference. Most of it can be done without printing. 

I second the notion of putting things on a laptop or table. Using online videos such as YouTube. Utilize an mp3 player to hold more audio materials.

Visit libraries along the way. They are often historical buildings and you can sit and use materials without cost in almost every place we have been. 

I guess a lot of it comes down to - have you decided what your goals are for this particular period of time? If you have hard a fast curriculum goals, then your approach is different than if your goal are more discussion and experience oriented. 

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